Daily Political Newspaper Summary: 8 September 2015

All newspaper references refer to Scottish editions. Where there is a link to a newspaper’s website, the relevant page reference is highlighted and underlined.

In addition to the newspaper stories outlined below, further news coverage can be found online at BBC News Scotland, STV News and Sky News.

Politics
Drone strike: Two British nationals, one from Aberdeen, who had joined Isis and were reportedly plotting terrorist activity in the UK, have been killed by a drone strike. (Heraldpage 1, Scotsman page 1, FT page 1, Telegraph page 1, Times page 1, National page 2, Sun page 1, Record page 1, Express page 1, P&J page 1, Courier page 17, Mail page 1, Guardian page 1)

Refugees: David Cameron has offered to take in 20,000 Syrian refugees over the five years of this Parliament, but other European countries have criticised him as other countries such as France and Germany are taking more refugees over a shorter timescale. (Herald page 6, Scotsman page 5, FT page 3, Telegraph page 4, Times page 6 and 7, National page 3, Express page 4, P&J page 18, Courier page 16, Mail page 8, Guardian page 1)

Colette Douglas Home comments on the current refugee crisis in the Herald page 13.

Peter Jones says that solving Syria won’t end the crisis in The Scotsman page 27.

BBC plans: The BBC’s plan to hire 100 journalists to provide content for local papers has been criticised as a ‘Trojan Horse’ by the Director of the Newspaper Society John McLellan.  Lord Hall, Director-General of the BBC, has said the corporation needs to adapt its news coverage to ‘meet the changing expectations of audiences across the UK.’ (Herald page 2, Scotsman page 17, Telegraph page 8, Times page 17, National page 8)

Welfare powers: Professor Jim Gallagher, a former adviser to the No campaign, has argued that the powers in relation to welfare in the current bill extending the powers of the Scottish Parliament need to be strengthened. He has also called for a written constitution to ‘formalise the devolution deal.’ (Herald page 7, Times page 2)

Alistair Carmichael: The lawyer representing former Scottish Secretary Alistair Carmichael has asked the court to dismiss the legal challenge to his election. (Herald page 7, Scotsman page 1, Telegraph page 6, Times page 1, National page 7, Courier page 13)

Legal brothels: An MSP, Jean Urquhart, has proposed plans for sex workers to be able to work together in the same premises without being arrested in a new bill. (Herald page 1 and 5, Scotsman page 12, Times page 16)

Currency Union: Iain Macwhirter argues that a separate Scottish currency would not have made more people vote for independence in The Herald page 15.

Economy
Delivery charges: Citizens Advice Scotland has warned that a million consumers in rural Scotland are paying unfair delivery charges of up to four times the standard rate. (Scotsman page 1, P&J page 12, Mail page 4)

Women in engineering:  Scottish Labour leader Kezia Dugdale has said there should be more support for women to encourage them into traditionally male-dominated engineering jobs. (Record page 2, Courier page 13)

North Sea industry: A new report by the regulator, the Oil and Gas Authority, has warned that whole areas of North Sea oil infrastructure are at risk of closing. (Herald page 8)

Education
National testing:  The teaching union the EIS has warned the Scottish Government that its plans for national tests for pupils in Scotland will not close the attainment gap between rich and poor. (Herald page 1, Scotsman page 21, Telegraph page 6)

Highland School: A school in the remote Highland community of Scoraig are looking for a teacher for their five-pupil school. (Herald page 3)

Justice
Sheku Bayoh:  Scotland’s Chief Constable Stephen House has told the family of Sheku Bayoh, who died in police custody, that lessons will be learned from the investigation into his death. (Herald page 2, Scotsman page 21, Times page 10, Courier page 2)

Local Government
City Deal: Aberdeen and its surrounding shire are trying to secure a £2.9 billion city region deal that could transform the economy and social environment of the north east of Scotland. (National page 10)