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Reform Scotland News 28 August 2015

Reform Scotland

Daily Political Newspaper Summary: 28 August 2015

All newspaper references refer to Scottish editions. Where there is a link to a newspaper’s website, the relevant page reference is highlighted and underlined.

In addition to the newspaper stories outlined below, further news coverage can be found online at BBC News Scotland, STV News and Sky News.

Politics

Police Scotland: Chief Constable Sir Stephen House has announced his surprise resignation, pledging that Police Scotland will ‘learn from its mistakes’. Mr House previously defended the force, and resisted pressure from ministers to resign following a series of major controversies. (Scotsman page 1, Herald page 1, Express page 1, Telegraph page 1, National page 1, Courier page 1, Sun page 1, 4-7, Times page 1, Record page 8, P&J page 13)

BBC Scotland: Nicola Sturgeon has joined critics accusing the BBC of failing to present fully impartial coverage of the independence referendum. She cited a lack of ‘critical analysis’ of the No camp but does not believe the BBC suffers from ‘institutional bias’. In response to popular criticism, the BBC is to appoint its first Scotland Editor.  (Herald page 1, Telegraph page 1-2, FT page 2, Sun page 2, Guardian page 3, Scotsman page 6, Guardian page 9, Courier page 13, National page 14, Times page 15)

Peerages: Entrepreneur Michelle Mone and former Labour chancellor Alistair Darling number amongst forty five new peers, with former Liberal Democrat MP Danny Alexander to be knighted. However the appointments of Ms Mone, and expenses scandal MP Douglas Hogg, have been subject to accusations of cronyism. (Herald page 1, Telegraph page 1,Express page 2, National page 5, Record page 6, Sun page 2, Times page 1, Scotsman page 12, Mail page 12, P&J page 12, Guardian page 20)

Migration record: Net migration into the UK has reached a record high of 330,000 a year, significantly surpassing David Cameron’s target of 100,000 a year. (Mail page 1, Sun page 2, Record page 2, Express page 4, National page 6, Herald page 6, Scotsman page 8, Courier 19)

 Fit-to-work fatalities: The TUC has demanded an inquiry following the release of records from the Work and Pensions department revealing that nearly 10,000 people claiming benefits died in a two year period after being declared fit for work. (Guardian page 1, Mail page 2, National page 5, Herald page 4, Record page 12)

Scottish Labour: The Scottish Labour party has attracted 3,400 new members since the General Election. Leader Kezia Dugdale is confident the party can be ‘a force for radical change’. (Record page 2, Herald page 6, Scotsman page 8)

Carmichael memo: Lib Dem leader Tim Farron has backed his party’s sole Scottish MP in attempts to retain his seat, following court action over a leaked memo showing his intentions to damage Nicola Sturgeon’s position in the run up to the general election. (Times page 2, Herald page 6)

Patrick Harvie in the National believes Sir Stephen House’s resignation is simply the tip of the iceberg of wider underlying problems in Police Scotland. (Page 11)

Martin Kettle in the Guardian believes that the new peerages are bloating an institution which already needs radical reform. (Page 39)

 

Economy

Solar subsidy: Energy campaigners have criticised what they describe as ‘absurd’ UK government plans to cut home solar panel subsidies by 87 per cent. The government will no longer fund its flagship ‘Green Deal’ programme. (Telegraph page 1, FT page 2, Herald page 6, Mail page 26, Guardian page 34)

Millionaires rising: Booming house prices have fuelled a 41 per cent rise in the numbers of millionaires in Britain, to 1 in every 65 adults. Scotland is ranked 10th out of 12 prosperity regions in the UK, yet now has 48,000 millionaires thanks to a ‘thriving’ entrepreneurial scene and financial sector.  (Herald page 11, Scotsman page 15, P&J page 20, Mail page 29, Guardian 36)

 

Health

Doctor shortage: Double the proportion of junior doctors leave Scotland in order to find work when compared with the rest of the UK, leading to shortages in certain fields. (Herald page 3)