0131 524 9500 | info@reformscotland.com

Reform Scotland News: 13 February 2013

All newspaper references refer to Scottish editions. Where there is a link to a newspaper’s website, the relevant page reference is highlighted and underlined.  In addition to the newspaper stories outlined below, further news coverage can be found online at BBC News Scotland, STV News and Sky News. 

Politics
Horsemeat:
The Food Standards Agency yesterday closed down Peter Boddy Licensed Slaughterhouse in West Yorkshire and Farmbox Meats in Aberystwyth after suspicions that the firms were involved in supplying horse carcases for use in products said to contain only beef.  (Scotsman page 1, Herald page 1, Times page 1, Sun page 1, Record page 6, Express page 2, Telegraph page 1, FT page 1, Mail page 1, Guardian page 4, Courier page 1, P&J page 12)

Press watchdog: The Conservatives at Westminster yesterday published plans to underpin press regulation with a Royal Charter which would cover the whole of the UK. (Scotsman page 11, Herald page 2, Times page 16, Sun page 2, Express page 2, Telegraph page 2, FT page 2, Mail page 10, Guardian page 13, Courier page 17, P&J page 20)

Ipsos MORI poll: An opinion poll for the Times has shown that support for independence has increased for the first time in over a year with 34 per cent now backing independence., while support for the Union has fallen to 55 per cent.  Support for independence amongst people aged 18 to 24 has doubled from 27 per cent last October to 58 per cent. (Times page 1, Sir Robert Worcester & Mark Diffley in the Times)

‘Separate’: The House of Commons clerks have reportedly banned the use of the word “separate” with regard to Scotland following protests from the SNP. (Scotsman page 12)

Chris Huhne: Further coverage of the trial of Vicky Pryce, Chris Huhne’s ex-wife, who denies perverting the course of justice by taking his speeding points using the defence of martial coercion. (Scotsman page 17, Herald page 5, Mail page 11, P&J page 17)

Scotland “extinguished”: Legal advice published by the UK government has commented that Scotland was “extinguished” in terms of international law in 1707.  The SNP is calling on pro-UK campaigners to distance themselves from the comments. (Herald page 6)

No campaign: Michael Fry in the Scotsman comments on what he sees as the “deterioration” on the unionist side of the independence debate. 

Opinion polls: Eddie Barnes in the Scotsman suggests that if the opinion polls on the independence referendum were to tighten it could encourage more people to vote.

Economy
High street sales:
The Scottish Retail Consortium KPMG sales monitor has reported that both total and like-for- like sales showed their best growth for 21 months in January. (Scotsman page 1, Herald page 24, Mail page 17)

Back-to-work schemes: Three Court of Appeal judges yesterday ruled that the government’s back-to-work scheme, which involved people having to work for free, was legally flawed. (Scotsman page 10, Herald page 6, Times page 12, Sun page 8, Express page 1, Stephen Pollard in the Express, Telegraph page 2, FT page 3, Mail page 4, Guardian page 1, Courier page 16, P&J page 21)

Remploy: Former Prime Minister Gordon Brown is due to meet with Work and Pensions Secretary Iain Duncan Smith and Scottish minister for Energy, Enterprise and Tourism, Fergus Ewing, to urge them to do more to keep two Remploy factories in Fife open. (Herald page 6, Record page 2)

Hydro-electric power: Brian Wilson in the Scotsman comments on the 70th anniversary of the legislation which created the North of Scotland Hydro Electric Board, a move he describes as the “boldest and most successful industrial venture ever undertaken in the Highlands and Islands”.

Transport
Scottish roads:
  A survey by the AA has found that Scotland was the worst part of the UK for potholes. (Herald page 1, Times page 9, P&J page 21)

Education
University research:
Peter Geoghegan in the Scotsman discusses proposals by the UK government to open up access to academic research.

Justice
Front-line police:
Deputy Chief Constable Rose Fitzpatrick has reportedly admitted that police officers in the new single police force will have to cover civilian roles. (Scotsman page 16)