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REFORM SCOTLAND NEWS: 25 AUGUST 2010

Reform Scotland

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Daily Political Newspaper Summary: 25 August 2010

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All newspaper references refer to Scottish editions. Where there is a link to a newspaper’s website, the relevant page reference is blue and underlined. 

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In addition to the newspaper stories outlined below, further news coverage can be found online at BBC News Scotland, STV News and Sky News. 

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Politics

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Advertising campaigns: The Scottish Government believes that the private sector and charities should help pick up the bill for its advertising campaigns aimed at changing people\’s lifestyles, according to a senior civil servant. Roger Williams, deputy director of marketing and digital for the Scottish Government, has claimed that there is not enough money available for the public sector to pay for many advertising campaigns and the private sector should take more social responsibility. (Scotsman page 10, Liz Cameron comments page 10) 

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David Cameron: Prime Minister David Cameron\’s wife Samantha has given birth to a baby girl while the couple and their children were on holiday in Cornwall. The baby was born weighing 6lb 1oz at the Royal Cornwall Hospital in Truro after Mrs Cameron was rushed to the hospital as a precaution following two days of contractions. Mrs Cameron, 39, had been due to give birth in September, and arrangements were in place for the Prime Minister to take paternity leave next month. (Scotsman page 7, Herald page 1, Times page 4, Telegraph page 1, Press and Journal page 5, Courier page 1, Guardian page 1, Sun page 13, Daily Express page 1, Daily Mirror page 7, Daily Mail page 6) 

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SNP/Labour: Joan McAlpine comments in the Scotsman that the idea that the Nationalists would be willing to form an alliance with Labour does not stand up to scrutiny. (Scotsman page 29)

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Film Festival: Hannah McGill, the director of the Edinburgh International Film Festival, is to step down from her post after four years to concentrate on writing. Ms McGill became artistic director of the EIFF in 2006, and said she would return to writing and pursue new projects, while remaining based in Scotland. Her departure comes at a time of great change for the festival, which is now held in June instead of the traditional festival time of August, and its major cinema, the Edinburgh Filmhouse. The two bodies are now being merged as a Centre for Moving Image, and earlier this year Ginnie Atkinson, the managing director, left the festival after 15 years. Sir Sean Connery, patron of the festival, also announced he would not be returning to the festival in the future. Funding issues are also looming, with a three-year funding pot of £1.8 million from the UK Film Council now at an end. (Herald page 4, Scotsman page 2)  

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Economy

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RBS: The Royal Bank of Scotland should not be given a second chance of a taxpayer bailout if it is involved in another financial crisis, its chief executive Stephen Hester has said. In a bold admission that the public would not tolerate further handouts, Mr Hester said all financial institutions – including RBS – should be allowed to fail and suffer the consequences without the state rushing to their aid. (Scotsman page 1, Herald page 26) 

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Gas discovery: A potential oil find by a Scottish company in the Arctic being hailed as the "new North Sea" has come under attack from environmental campaigners fearing a spill in the region could threaten hundreds of species of rare and endangered wildlife. Cairn Energy, the Edinburgh-based oil and gas explorer, has announced it has discovered gas in thin sands in the region – about 60 miles off Disko Island in west Greenland.  The find, which indicates potential for future discoveries of oil, has enraged campaigners who believe a disaster of the scale of the Gulf of Mexico spill earlier this year could wipe out native birds and animal species in the region. (Scotsman page 8, Herald page 3) 

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Offshore wind farms: Almost 50,000 people could be employed in jobs related to wind farms off the Scottish coast within a decade, but it could be as low as 1600 without proper investment, a new report claims. The first comprehensive study of the potential impact of offshore wind on the Scottish economy examines the prospects for offshore sites, largely earmarked for the east coast in two blocks – one off Fife in the firths of Forth and Tay, the other in the Moray Firth. The report – published yesterday and commissioned by the industry body Scottish Renewables and Scottish Enterprise – offers a range of scenarios for Scottish offshore wind industry development up to 2020. The most positive, which assumes proper investment in the grid, ports and training, sees this new industry creating as many as 48,000 jobs – 28,000 directly and a further 20,000 through related industries – by 2020. This would contribute £7.1 billion of investment to the economy. (Herald page 10, Press and Journal page 1, Courier page 1) 

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Justice

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Commonwealth Games: Les Gray, chairman of the Scottish Police Federation, said UK forces will not cope with the Glasgow Games and London Olympics and that it is “absolutely ludicrous” for England to bid for the World Cup. Forces across Scotland have been told to expect cuts of 25% over the next four years with 10%-12% in the first year. Mr Gray, who represents some 17,000 officers across Scotland, said: “If the level of cuts being talked about go through, there is no way we are going to be able to police these events. We will be struggling to do the day-to-day business as it is and I am astonished that the UK is bidding for the 2018 World Cup. (Herald page 1, Times page 6)