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REFORM SCOTLAND NEWS: 16 JUNE 2010

Reform Scotland

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Daily Political Newspaper Summary: 16 June 2010

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All newspaper references refer to Scottish editions. Where there is a link to a newspaper’s website, the relevant page reference is blue and underlined.  

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From today links to The Times will no longer be available due to the change in the newspaper’s website. 

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In addition to the newspaper stories outlined below, further news coverage can be found online at BBC News Scotland, STV News and Sky News  

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Politics

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Frank McAveety: Frank McAveety, the Labour MSP who chairs the Public Petitions Committee, was forced to apologise yesterday after he was caught on microphone making inappropriate and suggestive comments about a member of the public observing the committee. (Scotsman page 8, Herald page 1, Daily Telegraph page 1, Press and Journal page 1, Times page 5, Daily Mail page 5, Daily Express page 6) 

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Michael Moore Visit:  Ten out of fourteen committee conveners may boycott the Scottish Secretary Michael Moore’s visit to Holyrood tomorrow over a row about party managers interfering politically in committees. (Scotsman page 8) 

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Pensions: The union Unison has warned of industrial action over pensions and pledged a campaign against spending cuts, saying the government “won’t know what hit them”. The Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development has claimed taxpayers pay £3 towards public sector pensions for every £1 paid by state workers themselves. This comes after Nick Clegg’s comments that it is ‘unfair’ for taxpayers to pay for ‘gold plated public sector pension pots’. (Scotsman page 8, Daily Telegraph page 10, Guardian page 17, Financial Times page 4, Daily Express page 2) 

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Alex Bell: The former BBC and Herald journalist, Alex Bell, has become a special adviser to the SNP Government and is expected to work on policy issues focussing on renewable energy. (Herald page 4, Daily Telegraph page 2) 

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Fiscal Powers: The Scottish Council for Development and Industry has released a Blueprint for Scotland calling for Holyrood to be given greater control over taxing and spending to help promote sustainable economic growth north of the Border. (Herald page 24) 

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Economy

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Inflation: The Office of National Statistics reported yesterday that the Consumer Price Index put inflation at 3.4% in May, down 0.3% on April and lower than expected by the City. (Scotsman page 2, Herald page 24, Daily Telegraph page B2, Press and Journal page 8, Times page 45, Financial Times page 4) 

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Mansion House Speech: George Osborne is expected to unveil plans for new Bank of England powers in his first Mansion House speech tonight that could see restrictions introduced on the amount banks can lend and plans for a bank levy. (Daily Telegraph page 1, Times page 5, Financial Times page 1) 

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Scottish Retail: Scottish retail sales are down 0.8 per cent compared to year ago, highlighting fears about consumer confidence and the weakness of Scottish sales growth in comparison to the rest of the UK. (Press and Journal page 8, daily Mail page 4) 

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Health

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Missed appointments: Missed outpatient appointments cost the NHS £12m in Scotland in the nine months up to March. (Scotsman page 2)

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Front Line Service Cuts:  Health Secretary Nicola Sturgeon has been warned that the forty to fifty patients’ rights officer posts to be created under new legislation will mean front line service positions could be sacrificed. (Daily telegraph page 10) 

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Multiple Sclerosis:  Karen Howe, a former senior manager of the MS society in Scotland, has criticised the haste around controversial plans to close the only MS respite home in Scotland. Leuchie House in Berwick will close by the end of this year unless a new provider is found to run the service. (Scotsman page 10) 

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Green Spaces: A new study has shown that only men get the health benefits of reduced risks of heart and lung problems from living near parks and green spaces. (Scotsman page 14, Courier page 6) 

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Obesity and Sexual Health: A new study has found obese single women are more likely to have an unplanned pregnancy and less likely to seek advice on contraception than women of a healthy weight. (Scotsman page 17) 

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Parkinson’s: Parkinson’s UK campaigners have warned that hundreds of people with Parkinson’s in Scotland do not receive the vital medication for their condition on time and the lack of control of the disease is sending many into care homes unnecessarily. (Scotsman page 20, Courier page 8, Daily Mail page 30)

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Research Centres: A new centre aimed at creating life-saving drugs by harnessing ocean resources was opened in Scotland yesterday. (Scotsman page 24, Herald page 9, Daily Express page 25) 

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A new centre set to become one of the UK’s leading research facilities on ovarian, bowel and breast cancer will open in Edinburgh today as part of a network of centres run under Cancer Research UK. (Herald page 8) 

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MRSA:  Scottish researchers have found a substance produced by bees can halt the spread of MRSA by preventing the bacteria from growing. (Herald page 5) 

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Justice

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Saville Report: Yesterday Lord Saville’s report into the events of Bloody Sunday in Londonderry in 1972 concluded that the 14 civilians who were killed by paratroopers were unarmed and posed no threat.  David Cameron apologised on behalf of the government and described the soldiers’ actions as “unjustified and unjustifiable”. Six paratroopers involved in Bloody Sunday are criticising the report for making them scapegoats. (Scotsman page 1, Stephen McGinty in the Scotsman, Peter Geoghegan in the Scotsman, Clive Fairweather in the Scotsman, Peter Jones in the Scotsman, Herald page 1, John Patton in the Herald, Daily Telegraph page 1, Press and Journal page 1, Courier page 1, Times page 1, Guardian page 1, Jonathan Freedland in the Guardian, Financial Times page 2, Daily Mail page 1, Daily Record page 1)  

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Human Trafficking: A coalition of human rights organisations has called the UK’s new anti-trafficking measures “not fit for purpose”. The report criticises the lack of a single successful prosecution in Scotland and the lack of suitable, safe accommodation for victims. (Herald page 4, Press and Journal page 9, Guardian page 8) 

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Commonwealth Games: MSPs have been warned that the 2014 Commonwealth Games could attract human traffickers smuggling women into Scotland to work as prostitutes. (Scotsman page 17) 

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Police Interviews: The Lord Advocate, Elish Angiolini, has published new guidelines to help police forces to adapt to changes around a suspect’s access to a solicitor. (Herald page 4) 

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Education

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Mandarin Lessons: Lin Yanshen, deputy director general of the Tianjjin Municipal Education Commission, has praised the ‘Confucius classrooms’, established in 2007 to introduce the Chinese language and culture in seven Scottish schools, as creating a strong and lasting relationship between Scotland and China. (Herald page 5)  

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Local Government

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Aleos: Figures reveal that the twelve arms-length Glasgow City Council companies created by ex-Glasgow Councillor Steven Purcell ended last year almost £5million in debt, prompting opposition councillors to call for a wholesale review of the organisations. (Herald page 1) 

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Trump Development: Councillors in Aberdeenshire are being challenged over the uncertainty around the potential use of compulsory land purchase in the Trump development. (Scotsman page 15) 

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Happiness:  A happiness study by the insurance firm Aviva has found that most people feel happier than they did five years ago and that Edinburgh is the happiest city in the UK, while Londoners are the least happy. (Herald page 5)