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Daily Political Media Summary: 30 July 2009

Reform Scotland

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Daily Political Media Summary: 30 July 2009

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All newspaper references refer to Scottish editions. Where there is a link to a newspaper’s website, the relevant page reference is blue and underlined.

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Economy

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Diageo: First Minister Alex Salmond is facing a growing backlash from business leaders over his high-profile attempt to persuade Diageo not to axe 900 jobs in Kilmarnock and Glasgow. Institute of Directors Scottish director David Watt accused senior politicians of taking a "knee-jerk" and "random" approach to the company\’s decision to shed 700 jobs at its Johnnie Walker bottling plant in Kilmarnock and 200 at its Port Dundas distillery in Glasgow. Holyrood is set to debate Diageo’s decision when Parliament is back in session. George Kerevan comments in the Scotsman. (Scotsman page 8, page 26, Herald page 6, Times page 14, Courier page 6, STV)

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Future Jobs Fund: Scotland is getting a "raw deal" under the UK Government\’s plans to create jobs for the long-term unemployed, according to opposition politicians. They said Scotland was not being treated fairly after it emerged yesterday that of 47,000 jobs supported by the Future Jobs Fund throughout the UK; fewer than 3,000 are in Scotland. (Herald page 6, Press and Journal page 6, Courier page 3, BBC )

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Tourism: Scottish tourism could lose millions of pounds in business and hundreds of jobs if the UK Government does not reverse a decision to scrap tax concessions to people running self-catering holiday homes, it has been claimed. (Press and Journal page 12)

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Council Jobs: Nearly 3,000 Scottish jobs for youngsters not in education, employment or training, are to be created as part of a bid to lift a generation out of unemployment during the recession. UK ministers will pay 18- to 24-year-olds £6,500 for six months to fulfil roles from litter collecting to dance teaching. If they do not accept a job, their benefits could then be cut. (Scotsman page 2)

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Transport 

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Ryanair: Scotland faces losing up to 150,000 visitors a year after Ryanair announced it was axing three popular tourist routes to Prestwick to focus on sunshine destinations for holidaying Scots. The carrier is to end flights between the Ayrshire airport and Frankfurt in Germany, Krakow in Poland and Stockholm in Sweden in October and hopes to fly fuller aircraft to the Mediterranean and Canaries. (Scotsman page 10, Herald page 16, BBC)

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A9: A woman whose husband and granddaughter died in a crash on one of Scotland’s most notorious roads has called for urgent action to improve its appalling safety record. Security van driver Ian Shennan, from Moray, was jailed for two years and four months for causing the fatal crash at Crubenmore, nine miles north of Dalwhinnie on the A9 between Perth and Inverness. (Press and Journal page 1)

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Local Government

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Edinburgh Refuse:  Stephen MacGregor, the union leader at the centre of Edinburgh\’s refuse collection row, has reportedly said that the city\’s bin collectors have nothing to apologise for and insisted the dispute could have been headed off months ago. (Scotsman page 13)

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Health

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Junior Doctors: It remains unclear whether all hospitals in Scotland will hit a target to reduce the working hours of junior doctors when it comes into force in just a few days. The European Working Time Directive (EWTD), which limits working hours to an average of 48 a week, will apply to junior doctors from Saturday. The Scottish Government expects 94 per cent of doctors in NHS Scotland to be compliant by the start of August. (Scotsman page 8)

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Alcohol Misuse: Scotland\’s flagship legislation on alcohol has suffered a major blow after it emerged a key element has failed to stand up to scrutiny in the courts, a month before the new laws come in to full effect. It follows an appeal to the Sheriff Court by British Petroleum  (BP) to overturn a decision by the country\’s largest licensing authority to prevent two of its filling stations selling alcohol, a move that could now render one whole section of the Act redundant. (Herald page 1)

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Clostridium Difficile: Health secretary Nicola Sturgeon has been urged to call a major investigation after it was revealed that 28 people died in a Glasgow hospital from the clostridium difficile superbug.  NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde moved to defend concerns over death certification after Maryhill Labour MSP Patricia Ferguson also raised questions over how C diff was recorded at the hospital. (Herald page 8, Times page 18, Courier page 6, STV, BBC)

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Politics

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Calman Commission: Sir Kenneth Calman, whose commission recently issued its findings on the future of Scottish devolution, has accused SNP ministers of "fundamentally misrepresenting" it over claims it supported North Sea oil revenues being given to Scotland. In a letter to Finance Secretary John Swinney, Sir Kenneth claims the Nationalist administration has "skewed" the conclusions of his commission on the matter. (Scotsman page 15)

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Alex Salmond: The Liberal Democrats and the SNP have clashed over Alex Salmond’s dual role as an MP and an MSP. Scottish Lib Dem chief whip Mike Rumbles accused the SNP of double standards by calling for a by-election date in Glasgow North East but denying the same pleasure to voters in Banff and Buchan. Opposition members claim that as a member of both the House of Commons and the Scottish Parliament, Alex Salmond is unable to represent his constituents fully. (Press and Journal page 17)

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